Chicana/o Art HistoryTumblr (3.0; @chicanoarthistory)http://chicanoarthistory.com/Chicano Archives: Artistas Chicanos Los Quemados<a href="http://icaadocs.mfah.org/icaadocs/THEARCHIVE/FullRecord/tabid/88/doc/847390/language/en-US/Default.aspx">Chicano Archives: Artistas Chicanos Los Quemados</a>: <figure data-orig-width="740" data-orig-height="468" class="tmblr-full"><img data-orig-width="740" data-orig-height="468" src="http://68.media.tumblr.com/06f0e302e0f894335698473ab64a3119/tumblr_inline_nr13msJu4t1r0ijla_540.jpg"/></figure><p>Synopsis</p><p>This is an invitation to a group exhibition by the Chicano artist collective, Los Quemados, at the Instituto Cultural Mexicano in San Antonio, Texas, in 1975. Along with presenting information regarding the exhibition dates, inaugural reception, and program, the invitation also includes the name of the artists and a brief statement defining the goals of the collective and their artistic philosophy. As listed, Los Quemados was comprised of the following artists from Austin and San Antonio: Santa Barraza, Carolina Flores, Carmen Lomas Garza, Luis Guerra, Cesar Augusto Martinez, Santos Martinez, Amado Maurilio Peña, José Rivera, Vicente Rodriguez, and José Treviño.</p><p> Annotations</p><p>The exhibition announced in the invitation was the first group show for Los Quemados, a collective formed after its San Antonio predecessor, Con Safo, broke up in 1975 following disagreement among its members over the definition of Chicano art. The artists that formed Los Quemados believed that Chicanos should be able to create art that was not only “an artistic arm of a political ideology.” They also sought to affirm the creation of artworks that expanded rather than limited the perceptions of Chicano art. Both in its historical importance and aesthetic stance, the text gives testimony to the widespread artistic dialogues and disagreements that developed in the 1970s regarding the role of Chicano art.</p><p> Researcher: Tere Romo</p><p>Team: Chicano Studies Research Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, USA</p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/123300677217http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/123300677217Sun, 05 Jul 2015 15:04:53 -0400losquemadoschicanoartarthistorychicanoarthistorylatinoarthistorytexasartistsartistssan antoniotereromoChicano Art Essay: Towards a Critical Mass: Documenting the State of Chicano Art<a href="http://icaadocs.mfah.org/icaadocs/Portals/0/WorkingPapers/No2/Romo.ICAA%20Working%20Papers.pdf">Chicano Art Essay: Towards a Critical Mass: Documenting the State of Chicano Art</a>: <figure data-orig-width="576" data-orig-height="763" class="tmblr-full"><img data-orig-width="576" data-orig-height="763" src="http://68.media.tumblr.com/38fe01417e7aa4346ed16f584b499b13/tumblr_inline_nr13bvOayG1r0ijla_540.jpg"/></figure><p><a href="http://icaadocs.mfah.org/icaadocs/Portals/0/WorkingPapers/No2/Romo.ICAA%20Working%20Papers.pdf">Towards a Critical Mass: Documenting the State of Chicano Art</a></p><p> (PDF, 618 KB) Tere Romo, UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center </p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/123300069727http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/123300069727Sun, 05 Jul 2015 14:56:37 -0400chicanochicanoartarthistoryartchicanoarthistorytereromouclaicaamfahmfahhoustonmfahmuseumChicano Art Archives: Tomás Ybarra-Frausto Research Material on Chicano Art - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution<a href="http://www.aaa.si.edu/exhibitions/chicano-art">Chicano Art Archives: Tomás Ybarra-Frausto Research Material on Chicano Art - Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution</a>: <figure class="tmblr-full" data-orig-height="731" data-orig-width="450"><img data-orig-height="731" data-orig-width="450" alt="image" src="http://68.media.tumblr.com/3880561b10962e49a0feeeb831908175/tumblr_inline_nqgrbhdWMS1r0ijla_540.jpg"/></figure><p>In 1997, the Archives of American Art received a donation of 20 linear feet of research material on the Chicano art movement in the United States and Latin America, compiled by Dr. Tomás Ybarra-Frausto. Ybarra-Frausto was a professor at Stanford University in the department of Spanish and Portuguese and has published extensively on Latin American and U.S. Latino culture. Selected items from this collection were exhibited at the Archives New York Research center in the fall of 1998.</p><p>Image: El Teatro Campesino Fundraiser, 1978</p><p>Creator: Royal Chicano Air Force<br/></p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/122356983437http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/122356983437Wed, 24 Jun 2015 15:27:03 -0400chicano artsmithsoniantomasybarrafraustoamerican artarchiveschicano archichicanoarthistoryarthistoryartamericanartarchiveslationartChicano Art Video: E. Carmon Ramos explains “ Death of Rubén...<iframe width="400" height="225" id="youtube_iframe" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tCWwC7njrew?feature=oembed&enablejsapi=1&origin=http://safe.txmblr.com&wmode=opaque" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br/><br/><p>Chicano Art Video: E. Carmon Ramos explains “ Death of Rubén Salazar.“<br/></p><p>Published on Sep 30, 2013</p><p>In this series, E. Carmen Ramos, curator of Latino art, discusses the exhibition "Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art” at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. This episode looks at the painting “Death of Rubén Salazar” by Frank Romero.<br/><a title="http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=33584" href="http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=33584">http://www.americanart.si.edu/collect…</a><br/><br/>“Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art” presents the rich and varied contributions of Latino artists in the United States since the mid-twentieth century, when the concept of a collective Latino identity began to emerge. The exhibition is drawn entirely from the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s pioneering collection of Latino art. It explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture.<br/><a title="http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2013/our_america/" href="http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2013/our_america/">http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibit…</a></p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/122162845147http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/122162845147Mon, 22 Jun 2015 08:51:12 -0400chicanoartartarthistoryfrankromerorubensalazarsmithsonianamericanartlatinoartchicanochicanoarthistoryChicano Art Publication: VIVA Records, 1970-2000: Lesbian and Gay Latino Artists of Los Angeles (The Chicano Archives)<a href="http://www.amazon.com/VIVA-Records-1970-2000-Lesbian-Archives/dp/0895511495/ref=sr_1_17?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1434905358&sr=1-17&keywords=Chicano+art">Chicano Art Publication: VIVA Records, 1970-2000: Lesbian and Gay Latino Artists of Los Angeles (The Chicano Archives)</a>: <figure data-orig-width="260" data-orig-height="339"><img data-orig-width="260" data-orig-height="339" src="http://68.media.tumblr.com/be26c76768f8b377ab8c4f6f9849b3df/tumblr_inline_nqb08b3Ud01r0ijla_540.jpg"/></figure><p>Hernandez, Robb. 2013. <i>VIVA Records, 1970-2000: Lesbian and Gay Latino Artists of Los Angeles</i>. <br/></p><p>VIVA Records, 1970-2000: Lesbian and Gay Latino Artists of Los Angeles (The Chicano Archives). Robert Hernandez traces the history and assesses the impact of VIVA! Lesbian and Gay Latino Artists, a nonprofit artists’ coalition founded in 1987 in the Silverlake community of Los Angeles. Their aim was to increase the representation of lesbian Latina and gay Latino artists in the LA art scene. <br/></p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/122090664802http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/122090664802Sun, 21 Jun 2015 12:53:06 -0400chicanochicanoartlatinoartartistartarthistorychicanoarthistorylesbiangaylatinoartistslosangelesartistsgayartistsrobhernandezvivaqueerqueerartChicano Art Video: E. Carmen Ramos explains “Humanscape...<iframe width="400" height="225" id="youtube_iframe" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9brKfjJMi2s?feature=oembed&enablejsapi=1&origin=http://safe.txmblr.com&wmode=opaque" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br/><br/><p>Chicano Art Video: E. Carmen Ramos explains “Humanscape 62″<br/></p><p>Published on Sep 30, 2013</p><p>In this series, E. Carmen Ramos, curator of Latino art, discusses the exhibition “Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art” at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. This episode looks at the painting “Humanscape 62” by Melesio Casas.<br/><a title="http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=84441" href="http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artwork/?id=84441">http://www.americanart.si.edu/collect…</a><br/><br/>“Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art” presents the rich and varied contributions of Latino artists in the United States since the mid-twentieth century, when the concept of a collective Latino identity began to emerge. The exhibition is drawn entirely from the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s pioneering collection of Latino art. It explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture.<br/><a title="http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2013/our_america/" href="http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/archive/2013/our_america/">http://www.americanart.si.edu/exhibit…</a></p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/122009115382http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/122009115382Sat, 20 Jun 2015 12:46:41 -0400Mel casassmithsoniancarmen ramosecarmenramosamerican artouramericalatino artartchicanoartlatinoidentityarthistorylatinoarthistorychicanoarthistoryusartChicano Art Publication: Tradition and Transformation: Chicana/o Art from the 1970s through the 1990s<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/search?index=books&linkCode=qs&keywords=9780895511553">Chicano Art Publication: Tradition and Transformation: Chicana/o Art from the 1970s through the 1990s</a>: <figure data-orig-width="235" data-orig-height="346"><img data-orig-width="235" data-orig-height="346" src="http://68.media.tumblr.com/3ffe20fbc5a0770ccb34e68f9561f39d/tumblr_inline_nq7ec4wA2Z1r0ijla_540.jpg"/></figure><p>Goldman, Shifra M., Charlene Villaseñor Black, and Chon A. Noriega. 2015. <i>Tradition and transformation: Chicana/o art from the 1970s through the 1990s</i>. <br/></p><p><br/></p><p>Pioneering art historian Shifra Goldman brought the study of Chicana/o and contemporary Latin American art to the notice of art history. She was determined to correct the stereotypes that had distorted the critical reception of Chicana/o and Latina/o art since the 1950s. This collection of essays, edited and introduced by Charlene Villaseñor Black, not only represents her groundbreaking scholarship but also reflects her political activism. In these writings Goldman considers important theoretical issues, including how the Chicano movement influenced and was influenced by artists in the Southwest and Mexico and how different artistic visions clashed and interacted. She also investigates the careers of major Chicana/o artists, discusses specific series of artworks, and analyzes exhibitions, beginning with the historic <i>Chicano Art: Resistance and Affirmation</i>, which opened in Los Angeles in 1990 and then traveled cross-country, closing in Washington, DC, in 1993. Many of the illustrations have not been widely reproduced, adding to the importance of this collection.<br/></p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/121934719102http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/121934719102Fri, 19 Jun 2015 14:08:22 -0400chicano artartchicanolatino artlatinarthistorypocarthistoryarthistorianshifragoldmancaramelchonnoriegalatinomexicomexicanartchicanachicanaartlatinaartChicano art residency: WOODSTOCK AIR Program<a href="http://www.cpw.org/create/artist-residencies/">Chicano art residency: WOODSTOCK AIR Program</a>: <figure data-orig-width="700" data-orig-height="215" class="tmblr-full"><img data-orig-width="700" data-orig-height="215" src="http://68.media.tumblr.com/745723ee93ed98c2a248de9149375c36/tumblr_inline_nq610z81aR1r0ijla_540.jpg"/></figure><p> A residency program for artists of color working in the photographic arts. </p><p>The Woodstock Artist-in-Residency Program is designed to support artists of color working in the photographic arts who reside in the United States that would benefit with access to time, facilities, financial, critical, and technical support. This activity is created with an emphasis on supporting artists working in the photographic arts who are at the brink of their careers and promising talent. All of us lead very busy lives – the drive for this program is to free the artist from the busy routines and demands of everyday – and to provide a sanctuary for creativity.</p><p>WOODSTOCK A-I-R was listed among the <a href="http://www.artinfo.com/news/story/763138/a-guide-to-20-top-artist-residencies-and-retreats-across-the-united-states">top 20 residency programs in the U.S.</a> by Artinfo.</p><p>WOODSTOCK A-I-R encourages participants to pursue creative risk-taking in an environment rich in cultural resources. Working without distraction or interruption, participants focus intensely on their own work, continuing works in progress, setting goals for the future, and breaking new ground.</p><p>Each year CPW offers 7 residencies for artists of color and 1 “critical studies residency” for a curator/critic of color.</p><p>A-I-R’s receive:</p><ul><li>accommodations at a historic artist residence located within walking distance from CPW and the center of Woodstock’s business district</li> <li>24/7 access to CPW’s workspace facilities (including black-&-white darkroom, digital imaging stations, and library)</li> <li>critical and technical support</li> <li>stipend for food and travel, and honorarium</li> <li>exhibition and related opportunities</li> </ul><p>Established in 1999, WOODSTOCK A-I-R has been made possible in part with support from the Phillip & Edith Leonian Foundation, the Milton & Sally Avery Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA), a state agency, with support from Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.</p><p>The Center for Photography at Woodstock was a member of the New York State Artist Workspace Consortium (NYSAWC). For more information on NYSAWC and how organizations like CPW are providing essential support for working artists, please visit <a href="http://www.nysawc.org">www.nysawc.org</a>.</p><p>For more information on WOODSTOCK A-I-R program, please <a title="Contact Us" href="http://www.cpw.org/connect/contact/">contact us</a>.</p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/121878041527http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/121878041527Thu, 18 Jun 2015 20:22:45 -0400airresidency projectpoc residentartistpocartistartistopportunitieswoodstockphotographersphotographyChicano Art Conference: Latino Art Now! Re-imaging Global Intersections<a href="http://www.latino.si.edu/LatinoArtNow/_PDF/LAN2016_call4papers.pdf">Chicano Art Conference: Latino Art Now! Re-imaging Global Intersections</a>: <figure data-orig-width="1260" data-orig-height="578" class="tmblr-full"><img data-orig-width="1260" data-orig-height="578" src="http://68.media.tumblr.com/d26f458d1f487e3dc9dc4dcedc21f884/tumblr_inline_nq4497QsHY1r0ijla_540.png"/></figure><p><b>CALL FOR PAPERS AND PARTICIPATION</b><br/><b><br/></b> <b>Latino Art Now! Re-imaging Global Intersections Conference</b> <b>Fifth Biennial Conference</b> <b>April 7-9, 2016</b> <b>Chicago, Illinois</b> <b> </b> The Latino Art Now! Re-imaging Global Intersections Conference in Chicago will examine the contemporary shifting contours of US Latino art and the (trans) national and global cultural forces that continuously shape it and how it in turn shapes these forces. <br/> At mid-decade we are witnessing growth of the field in American Art History as well as in Latino visual culture.  Renewed visibility for artists in a wave of major exhibitions at national museums and galleries, the expansion of curatorial and academic infrastructure, and new publication and research initiatives tend to signal wider and expanding opportunities.   Can we at the present moment map Latino art activity within a larger transnational, hemispheric and global context and discourse?   Can we re-image a more global American art?  How have Latino artists entered transnational and global art networks?  Taking cities as critical spaces of globalization, what can we say of urban interventions as sites of artivism?   What are the future directions? In other words, what is Latino Art Now? <br/> We invite multidisciplinary submissions of 300-500 word paper abstracts on the following themes: <br/> ·       Artivisms/Social Practice Art ·       The City as Site and Source ·       Outside the White Cube: Digital Interventions ·       Queer Geographies of Latino Art ·       Intersections: Latino/Latin American ·       Comparative Art Histories ·       Curatorial Negotiations: Authority and Display ·       Recalibrating Framework and Canon ·       Art from Emergent Latino Groups ·       Public/Private Collecting and Collections ·       Global Networks and Intersections ·       Latino Futurisms ·       Recovering Early Artists and Legacies ·       Reassessing Design and Architecture ·       Latino Art Market ·       Art as an Economic Stimulus ·       Defying Categories <br/></p><p><b> </b> <b>Abstract Submissions and Deadline for Conference Papers, Panels, Roundtable Conversations</b> The conference organizers seek original, innovative papers and panels engaging a wide range of visual media including painting, sculpture, graphics, photography, installation, architecture and design, digital and new media. <br/> In addition, the conference will feature a series of Roundtable Conversations on Artists in the Making of the Equitable City. <br/> Please submit paper/panel/roundtable abstracts electronically to: <a href="mailto:iuplr-chicago@uic.edu">iuplr-chicago@uic.edu</a> Abstract/CV Submission deadline is Monday, October 19, 2015 <b><br/></b></p><p><b>Selection Process</b> The IUPLR Conference Program Committee will select papers that will be presented at the conference.  Selected panelists will be notified via email by Monday, November 16, 2015. <b>Conference Papers</b> Selected conference papers should be 20 minutes in length (10 pages double-space).  We request that each selected panelist submit a finished paper no later than March 15, 2016.  All accepted presenters must register. <b> </b> <b>About the <br/></b></p><p><b>Latino Art Now! Conference</b> The Latino Art Now Conference was first held in 2005 at Hunter College in New York.  Since then, it has become the leading national forum for artists, art historians, art professionals, educators, scholars, critics, collectors and art dealers.  Its overarching conceptual aim is to explore U.S. Latino art as part of contemporary American visual culture and art while advancing awareness, education, scholarship and knowledge in this emerging filed of inquiry. <br/><b><br/></b></p><p><b>Conference Website: </b><a href="http://www.latino.si.edu/LatinoArtNow/_PDF/LAN2016_call4papers.pdf">http://www.latino.si.edu/LatinoArtNow/_PDF/LAN2016_call4papers.pdf</a> <b><br/></b> <b>Conference Venues </b> Chicago Cultural Center Thursday, April 7, 2016 78 E Washington St, Chicago, IL 60602 <br/> University of Illinois at Chicago<b><br/></b>Student Center East, Conference Center <br/> Friday and Saturday, April 8-9, 2016<br/> 750 Halsted Street, Chicago, IL 60607 <br/> National Museum of Mexican Art<br/> Friday, April 8, 2016<br/> 1852 West 19th Street, Chicago, IL 60608<br/><br/> Puerto Rican Arts Alliance Saturday, April 9, 2016<br/> 3000 North Elbridge, Chicago, IL 60618 <br/><b><br/></b></p><p><b>Registration Categories</b> All conference attendees must register General Registration: $90/$35 per day<br/> Artists Registration: $40/$15 per day<br/> Student Registration with ID: $25/$10 per day <br/> Registration includes admittance to all panel sessions, workshops, art exhibitions and book fair; admittance to plenary session,  welcoming reception on Thursday; admittance to the reception on Friday at the National Museum of Mexican Art; admittance to the reception at UIC; and LAN Conference Program booklet. <br/><b><br/></b></p><p><b>Registration Website</b> <<a href="http://www.iuplr.uic.edu/">http://www.iuplr.uic.edu/</a>> <br/><b>Transportation and Hotel</b> All registered participants are responsible for their own reservations, air or ground transportation, and lodging costs. LAN Conference Hotels are (Pending room block agreement) <br/> The Crowne Plaza Chicago Metro Downtown 733 West Madison, Chicago, IL 60661  <a href="denied:tel:%28312%29%20829-5000">(312) 829-5000</a> <br/> The W Hotel City Center 172 W Adams St, Chicago, IL 60603   <b>(312) <br/></b></p><p><b>332-1200</b> <b> </b> <b>LAN Conference is organized by</b> ·        Inter-University Program for Latino Research (IUPLR) headquartered at the University of Illinois at Chicago and The Smithsonian Latino Center, Smithsonian Institution        For additional information or questions regarding this Call for Papers, please contact Olga Herrera at <a href="mailto:oherre15@uic.edu">oherre15@uic.edu</a><br/></p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/121792703302http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/121792703302Wed, 17 Jun 2015 19:35:04 -0400chicano artconferencelatinoartlatinoartnowartconferenceacademicpocarthistoryChicano Art Conference: Latino Art Now! 2013 Conference at the€“ Smithsonian Latino Center<a href="http://latino.si.edu/LatinoArtNow/">Chicano Art Conference: Latino Art Now! 2013 Conference at the€“ Smithsonian Latino Center</a>: <p><img alt="" src="https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQr8j1n4mkGl5FQ50aSNFYSYHsE2k4kGdlifHHjkf-qecZntbi1JA"/></p> <p>Since 2005 the <span class="italic bold">Latino Art Now!</span> Conference has become the leading national forum for artists, art historians, art professionals, educators, scholars, critics and art dealers. Its overarching conceptual aim is to explore U.S. Latino art and its relationship to contemporary American visual culture and art while advancing awareness, education, scholarship and knowledge in this emerging field of inquiry.</p> <p><span class="lead-black bold">PROGRAM</span></p> <p><span class="lead-black bold"><span class="italic">Latino Art Now! Nuestra América: Expanding Perspectives in American Art</span> Fourth Biennial Conference</span></p> <p>November 7-9, 2013</p> <p>Smithsonian Institution</p> <p>Washington, D.C.</p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/58240738024http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/58240738024Wed, 14 Aug 2013 09:44:29 -0400latino art nowSmithsonian Latino Centersmithsonianchicano artlatino artconferenceartcuratorsart historiansart professonialsartistslatino artistsChicano Art Essay: Towards a Critical Mass: Documenting the State of Chicano Art by Tere Romo<a href="http://icaadocs.mfah.org/icaadocs/Portals/0/WorkingPapers/No2/Romo.ICAA%20Working%20Papers.pdf">Chicano Art Essay: Towards a Critical Mass: Documenting the State of Chicano Art by Tere Romo</a>: <p><em><img alt="" src="http://icaadocs.mfah.org/icaadocs/portals/0/PublicationsThumbs/icaa_working_papers_2.png"/></em></p> <p><em>ICAA Documents Project Working Papers</em></p> <p><a href="http://icaadocs.mfah.org/icaadocs/Portals/0/WorkingPapers/No2/ICAA%20Working%20Papers2%20May08.pdf" target="_blank"><span>Number 2 May 2008</span> </a></p> <p><a href="http://icaadocs.mfah.org/icaadocs/Portals/0/WorkingPapers/No2/Romo.ICAA%20Working%20Papers.pdf" target="_blank">Towards a Critical Mass: Documenting the State of Chicano Art</a> (PDF, 618 KB)</p> <p><em>p 35-42</em></p> <p>Tere Romo, <em>UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center</em></p> <p>The <em>ICAA Documents Project Working Papers</em> series brings together papers stemming from the Documents of 20th-century Latin American and Latino Art Project at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. The series also serves as the official publishing platform for assembling and distributing related research by the center’s team of researchers, staff, and affiliates. The series is available in both print and electronic formats.</p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/54689279299http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/54689279299Fri, 05 Jul 2013 14:56:00 -0400tere romochicano articaauclachicano studies research centerlatino artmfahChicano Art Essay: A Panorama of Latino Art by Dr. Tomás Ybarra-Frausto,<a href="http://www.nps.gov/latino/latinothemestudy/arts.htm?utm_source=May+2013+E-boletin+Newsletter&utm_campaign=May+2013+E-boletin+Resend&utm_medium=email">Chicano Art Essay: A Panorama of Latino Art by Dr. Tomás Ybarra-Frausto,</a>: <p><br/><em><img alt="" src="https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ8mDmrQ1xTETqVxMnLkKSx7TpAnvEJ28vxsKesw9IKxQBZCZSdjQ"/></em></p> <p><span><span>This essay explores Latino arts in the U.S. including the performing arts, visual arts, and literary arts as well as the impact of Latino artists on the nation and the world.</span><span><br/></span></span></p> <p>This is part of <em>American Latinos and the Making of the United States: A Theme Study, </em>a publication of the National Park System Advisory Board (NPSAB) for the National Park Service (NPS).</p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/50685032532http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/50685032532Fri, 17 May 2013 19:24:00 -0400tomas ybarra fraustochicanolatino artscholarlatino art essaypanoramalatino visual artsartliterary artsVictor, Ochoa, Chicanosaurus, 1989<img src="http://68.media.tumblr.com/1eef7c3f3a32c824dafaf675a67471c2/tumblr_ml0gq9n04D1rn0fi7o1_500.jpg"/><br/><br/><p>Victor, Ochoa, <em>Chicanosaurus</em>, 1989</p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/47573809772http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/47573809772Tue, 09 Apr 2013 19:18:09 -0400victor ochoachicanosauruslatino artchicano artvisual artinstallationdinosaurartChicano Art Publication: The Mexican Museum of San Francisco Papers, 1971–2006<a href="http://www.chicano.ucla.edu/publications/book/mexican-museum-san-francisco-papers">Chicano Art Publication: The Mexican Museum of San Francisco Papers, 1971–2006</a>: <p><img alt="" src="http://www.chicano.ucla.edu/files/styles/media_object_thumbnail/public/publications/MexMus_cover%5B1%5D.jpg?itok=KsYSrSf4"/></p> <div><em>The Mexican Museum of San Francisco Papers</em>, 1971–2006, is the first historical account of the institution, which is the oldest museum in the United States that focuses on Mexican and Mexican American art. Karen Mary Davalos draws on the CSRC’s collection of administrative documents to trace the museum’s growth from the early 1970s, when planning began, to 2006, when the museum closed its exhibition space in Fort Mason.</div> <p></p> <div> </div> <div>Dr. Davalos explores the influences that guided the museum’s development—the vision of its founder, the desires of curators and patrons, the energy of the Chicano movement—and analyzes its influential exhibition program and nationally recognized education program. In a separate section she offers a series of topics for further research. The volume concludes with a guide to the collection and a selected bibliography.</div> <p></p> <div class="panel-pane pane-entity-field pane-node-field-isbn-paper"> <div class="pane-content"> <div class="field field-name-field-isbn-paper field-type-text field-label-inline clearfix"> <div class="field-label">ISBN (paper): </div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even">978-0-89551-122-5</div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="panel-pane pane-entity-field pane-node-field-format"> <div class="pane-content"> <div class="field field-name-field-format field-type-list-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even">Paperback</div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="panel-pane pane-entity-field pane-node-field-no-pages"> <div class="pane-content"> <div class="field field-name-field-no-pages field-type-number-integer field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even">214 pages.</div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="panel-pane pane-entity-field pane-node-field-illustrations"> <div class="pane-content"> <div class="field field-name-field-illustrations field-type-text field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item even">13 black and white illustrations.; 8.5 x 11 in</div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p></p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/46513760207http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/46513760207Thu, 28 Mar 2013 12:33:00 -0400chicano studieschicano artchicanokaren mary davalosmexican museum of san franciscousmuseumslatino museumsmexican museumscalifornia museumspapersucla paperssan francisco papersethnic studieslatinoart historyChicano art bookchicano art historyChicano Art Resource: chicanoparksandiego.com<a href="http://www.chicanoparksandiego.com/">Chicano Art Resource: chicanoparksandiego.com</a>: <p><img alt="" src="http://www.chicanoparksandiego.com/gifs/main2.jpg"/></p> <p>The History of Chicano Park web site supports <strong>MAS 350B: Mexican American Studies - Chicano History</strong> at San Diego State University. This class involves the study of the history of Chicanos since 1848, using Chicano Park as a point of departure for research and study. The main emphasis of the class will be to survey the major themes of Chicano history that are suggested by the murals of Chicano Park in Barrio Logan San Diego, and to do research on the park in order to contribute to its preservation by revealing the rich artistic and cultural legacy its embodies.</p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/45496828262http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/45496828262Sat, 16 Mar 2013 10:00:58 -0400chicano parrkchicano artcaliforniamural projectSan Diego State University1848Chicano parkbarrio logansan diegoartpubliccalifornia historyart historychicano art historyChicano Art Resources: Mexican and Chicano Art History on the Net by Santa Ana College<a href="http://www.sac.edu/StudentServices/Library/Pages/MexicanChicanoArt.aspx">Chicano Art Resources: Mexican and Chicano Art History on the Net by Santa Ana College</a>: <p><img alt="" src="http://www.sac.edu/Style%20Library/SAC/Images/logoSAC.png"/></p> <p>Link Collection by Santa Ana College of various resources for Latino and Chicano art.</p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/45421853832http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/45421853832Fri, 15 Mar 2013 11:27:30 -0400Latinochicanoartprecolumbian artsanta anacollegelinkschicano art historyart historymuralsgraffitiChicano Art News: Moving a National Latino Art Agenda Forward by Eduardo Diaz, Dierctor, Smithsonian Latino Center<a href="http://www.newstaco.com/2013/03/06/moving-a-national-latino-art-agenda-froward/">Chicano Art News: Moving a National Latino Art Agenda Forward by Eduardo Diaz, Dierctor, Smithsonian Latino Center</a>: <p><img alt="" src="http://www.newstaco.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Smithsonian_Latino_Center-300x109.png"/></p> <p>Receiving less notice was pending legislation establishing the <a href="http://americanlatinomuseum.org/" target="_hplink">National Museum of the American Latino</a>. A special commission, appointed by the President (George W. Bush, then Barack Obama) and Congress submitted its report in May 2011 calling for the creation of the museum. With the advent of a new Congress, authorizing legislation designating the museum as part of the Smithsonian Institution will likely be reintroduced this year. Most observers hope that this process will be handled with the same bipartisan spirit that greeted the 2011 report.</p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/44876942685http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/44876942685Fri, 08 Mar 2013 14:55:28 -0500Smithsonian Latino centerLatino museumchicano artchicanoa art historylatino artartEduardo Diazculture clashNational Museum of the American LatinoChicano Art Article: How Chicano Is It? by Carolina A. Miranda<a href="http://www.artnews.com/2010/09/01/how-chicano-is-it/">Chicano Art Article: How Chicano Is It? by Carolina A. Miranda</a>: <p><img alt="" src="https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRQZdvDexuHcvkqUqZqxDoteAhiW_pZQwNVIMIlsLWvIyuoZ5cp3Q"/></p> <h3><em>Young artists of Mexican American heritage are gaining visibility for work that often touches on their ethnic identity—along with other themes, from the conceptual to the formal. But they’re conflicted about being defined by it.</em></h3> <p><br/>Posted <span class="date-meta"><strong>09/01/10</strong></span></p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/44638190301http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/44638190301Tue, 05 Mar 2013 13:02:51 -0500Anthony HernandezAscoCalifornia Institute of the ArtsCarolina A. MirandaChicano artChicano Studies Research Center at UCLALos Angeles County Museum of ArtWhitney BiennialsChicano Art Article: Arte Chicano de Texas=Texas Chicano Art by Charlotte Moser<a href="http://icaadocs.mfah.org/icaadocs/THEARCHIVE/FullRecord/tabid/88/doc/803231/language/en-US/Default.aspx">Chicano Art Article: Arte Chicano de Texas=Texas Chicano Art by Charlotte Moser</a>: <p><img alt="" src="http://icaadocs.mfah.org/icaadocs/Portals/0/thumbs/225x280/803231.jpg"/></p> <p>Charlotte Moser points out the efflorescence of Chicano art in Texas in the 1970s and how this decade saw the formation of a generation of college-educated Chicano artists; the foundation of Chicano art centers and exhibitions spaces; and the formation of exhibition and advocacy groups, such as the San Antonio group Con Safo, founded in 1972.</p> <div> <div class="label ">AUTHOR</div> <div class="value ">Moser, Charlotte</div> </div> <div> <div class="label "></div> <div class="label ">TITLE</div> <div class="value ">Arte Chicano de Texas=Texas Chicano Art / Charlotte Moser</div> </div> <div> <div class="label ">IN</div> <div class="value "> <p>Artes Visuales (México D.F., Mexico). –  no. 29 (Jun. 1981)</p> </div> </div> <div> <div class="label ">DESCRIPTION</div> <div class="value ">p. 57-61 : ill.</div> </div>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/44374556500http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/44374556500Sat, 02 Mar 2013 10:50:56 -0500charlotte mosericaacon safosan antoniochicano artchicano art historytexaschicano art in texaschicanoart1972artchicanodetexasart chicano de texasChicano Art History: Chicano Art Networks in Texas by the Texas State Historical Association<a href="http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/kjc04">Chicano Art History: Chicano Art Networks in Texas by the Texas State Historical Association</a>: <p><img alt="" src="http://www.tshaonline.org/sites/all/themes/custom/tsha/logo.png"/></p> <p>Brief rundown of the Chicano arts institutions, collectives, publications of Texas.</p> <p>Citation:</p> <p>Teresa Palomo Acosta and Kendall Curlee, “CHICANO ART NETWORKS,” <em>Handbook of Texas Online</em> (<a href="http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/kjc04">http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/kjc04</a>), accessed February 21, 2013. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.</p>http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/43635258974http://chicanoarthistory.com/post/43635258974Thu, 21 Feb 2013 03:59:32 -0500chicano art networkschicano art historytexas chicanostexastexas state historical associationteresa palomo acostakendall curlee